© 1993-2017 | All artwork by Pieter Vanderbeck.

Photographs by Nathaniel Becker & Brendan Wiltse.

Photographs of drawings by Brett Rutherford.

Pieter Vanderbeck

7 Governor Street

Providence, RI 02906

To purchase one of Pieter's drawings contact him via telephone [401-351-9542] during the months of November through April.

 

May through October you can set up a purchase by finding him somewhere in the Adirondack High Peaks. A better option would be to send Pieter a letter. [ Pieter Vanderbeck \ 7 Governor Street \ Providence, RI 02906 ]

 

Reservations can be obtained by contacting the webmaster.

Due to the limitations of digital photography (because the images of Pieter's artwork on this page were taken with flash photography), the colors and lighting of the drawings may not be exactly as they appear. They will be better in person.

PURCHASE A DRAWING

PURCHASE A BOOK

TWILIGHT OF THE DICTATOR'S
(with Brett Rutherford)

 

Poet's Press, 1992

Twilight of the Dictators is a compilation of poems and drawings from the Cold War era. Pieter and his friend Brett Rutherford rage against the tyranny of the ruling class and celebrate when it is overthrown.

Large Heading

INDIA POINT
by Pieter Vanderbeck

 

...

Coming Soon!

COFFEE BREAK
by Pieter Vanderbeck

... 

Purchase physical copy on Amazon. ($12.95)

 

Purchase digital copy from Poet's Press  ($4)

 

It’s easy to treat the “little people” who do the world’s unmemorable jobs as comical characters, like the bus drivers and sewer workers in televison’s The Honeymooners, or to veer to the other extreme in tragic portrayals like Death of a Salesman. Now artist and poet Pieter Vanderbeck dons the cap of Nikolai Gogol and lifts the lid on a microcosm of American corporatism amid a humble cast of characters: security guards, desk clerks, maintenance men, and janitors working at the bottom rung of an unspecified company.


Coffee Break spins from America’s caffeine obsession and the relentless, aggressive advertising that once dominated the radio airwaves, and focuses on a crew of working men and women who seldom leave the corridors, offices and infrastructures of a single building, for whom the coffee break is a brief respite of humanity and a glimmer of camraderie. Atop them is a supervisor, and atop him, an arrogant anthill of bosses with schemes, theories, controls and disciplines.


Coffee Break is comedy, rife with satire on the limited, and self-limiting, perspectives of workers who know little else than work, but it goes deeper, showing how those at every level of a company enact the inept cruelties of their bosses upon those below them, so that even a janitors’ workroom or a restroom stall, becomes a place of surveillance.   (Blurb by Brett Rutherford.)